Palliative Care Zoominar “Being the Best Companion for Palliative Patients”

By humasfik On Sunday, June 20 th, 2021 · no Comments · In

Students from the Masters of Nursing Study Program, specializing in Oncology Nursing, University of Indonesia held a webinar about palliative care with the topic “Being the Best Companion for Palliative Patients”. This event was held on Sunday, 20 June 2021 from 09.00 – 12.00 GMT+7 through online platform, zoom meeting. This event also was held as an implementation of the Palliative Nursing Course in the Master of Nursing Study Program, specializing in Oncology Nursing. The speaker who was present to discuss a lot about palliative care in this event is Ns. Mamay Kusumawaty, Ns. Ria Andjarwati, and Ns. Alfhy Septiana Ningsih who are students of the Master of Nursing Study Program, specializing in Oncology Nursing, FoN UI. The actitivy in this event are opening by the MC, reading the rules, praying which is leads by Ns. Imam Ghozali, singing the anthem Indonesia Raya and Mars PPNI, greeting from the chief executive of this event, greeting from the person in charge of the webinar, also greeting from the Dean of FoN UI, followed by material delivery, opening a question and answer session, followed by a door prize session, and ended up with closing session.

The palliative care webinar was opened by the MC, Ns. Dwi Suryani, then followed by a praying, and followed by singing the national anthem Indonesian Raya and Mars PPNI. After that, the event was continued with greeting from the chief executive who was followed by greeting from the person in charge of the zoominar and greeting from the dean of FoN UI.

“Currently, FoN UI has opened a new specialization, Oncology Nursing in the Masters of Nursing Study Program. Our goal in holding this event is that we hope the family or caregiver will be able to understand how to be the best companion for palliative patients,” said Ns. Rudi who gave a speech as the head of the palliative care webinar.

The event was continued with the delivery of material about the concept of palliative care by the first speaker, Ns. Mamay Kusumawati. Ns. Mamay said that usually cancer patients who came to the hospital are already at an advanced stage, which causes the patient to have complex problems due to the metastases process. “Therefore, patients need a comprehensive approach from various disciplines so that patients have a better quality of life. That’s why palliative care is needed,” said Ns. Mamay when delivering material

The event was continued with the delivery of material about the needs of palliative patients by the second speaker, Ns. Ria Andjarwati.

“Patients’ needs during palliative care vary at each stage, from being diagnosed with cancer to the end of life. By knowing the problems experienced by patients, health workers and families can meet the patient’s needs so that the patient’s quality of life can be improved,” said Ns. Ria when giving material.

The last presentation session is about the caregiver’s role in caring for palliative patients, delivered by the third speaker, Ns. Alfhy Septiana Ningsih.

“Caregivers can takes care the patient and support palliative care programs. The caregiver is a person who provides emotional support, takes care of patients (such as bathing, dressing, preparing food, and preparing medicine), managing finances, making decisions about treatment, and communicating with health services,” said Ns. Alfhy during the material delivery session

This palliative care webinar is open to the general public or health workers and was attended by 235 participants. All participants who attended this webinar showed their enthusiasm as indicated by the increasing number of participants during the activity. In addition, participants also actively participated by asking various questions about palliative care. After the qna session ended, continued with the announcement of the door prize winners, and ended up with closing session. Hopefully this event could increase the knowledge of families or health workers in providing palliative care so they can be the best companions for patients with palliative care